Thursday, November 21, 2013

Turbine Oil Degradation with Greg Livingstone, Fluitec International

Join us for this week's interview, where we talk with Greg Livingstone, Chief Marketing Officer of Fluitec International about dealing with turbine oil degradation. He covers the types of oils used in turbines and their properties, different modes of degradation and where/when they can occur, as well as solutions to common issues like varnish. 

Click below to play the interview, or click here to download and listen to the file, or click here to read the transcript.



You may also be interested in our interview with Greg on Turbine Oil Selection.

Happy listening!

Tuesday, September 3, 2013

The Nature of Genius & Tesla

I just finished reading Nikola Tesla: Imagination and the Man That Invented the 20th Centuryby Sean Patrick (got it free for my Kindle)As of today's post, it's still available for free at Amazon. It was an interesting read, especially so given its tie to next month's Sounding Board column in TLT.

Our readers have just finished responding to a survey that asked about the nature of genius (your definition), which genius (living or dead) you'd most like to meet and what you'd ask that person, whether you've met a genius, and if you could magically become a genius, would you like to or not? Respondents to the survey would like to meet Tesla, as well as many other folks like Thomas Edison, George Westinghouse, Leonardo da Vinci, Steve Jobs and Walt Disney. If you missed your chance to contribute, I encourage you to submit your responses below in the comments area. Or, give the article a read, either by reading TLT online (look to the September 2013 issue), or by going directly to the article (PDF).

The book was very brief (about 120 pages) and less about Tesla (than expected) and more about the nature of genius and creativity. The book makes 4 arguments:
  1. That you have to be "'smart enough' to fulfill the intellectual requirements for success" but after that, IQ ceases to make a distinguishable difference. Akin to being "tall enough" for the NBA. However, IQ alone doesn't explain success. 
  2. Another common factor that researchers recognize in all great performers: "they practiced so hard and intensely that it hurt," with the author referring to the "10,000 hour rule." Dr. K Anders Ericsson coined the phrase, and regardless if you have an innate talent, he argues that you need that amount of hours of "focused, intentional practice." 
  3. Not only that, you need to have dedication - because 10,000 hours is a lot of work. 
  4. Finally, there's the issue of opportunities. If you haven't read it, Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell is also a good, solid read, and if you like hockey (among other things), provides some insight into the sport and its stars. Basically, being closer to the cut-off age to play hockey meant you got an entire year to get better and outshine other, younger (and smaller) players. Hence, you were given more opportunities, creating an "accumulative advantage" compared to other kids with later birthdays.
Utilizing these concepts, the author presents the idea of the "genius code," penned by psychologist Dr. Alfred Barrios. This particular book addresses one component of the code: imagination. And below are some quotes I found particularly interesting along this vein:
  • "When you start viewing creativity as a process of combination, and imagination as the ability to connect, stretch, and merge things in new ways, creative brilliance becomes  less mystifying. A creative genius is just better at connecting the dots than others are."
  • "There's a catch to 'combinatorial creativity,' though. Before you can connect the dots, you need to have dots to connect...The more varied your knowledge and experiences are, the more likely you are to be able to create new associations and fresh ideas."
  • "It takes curiosity to find your call to adventure, it takes courage to venture into the unknown, and it takes imagination to create your path." And, like Tesla, you must create something "exactly as you envision it, no matter how much work it takes, or how many people try to stop you."
If you didn't get a chance to respond to the survey, which genius would you include on the list and what would you ask them? And, if you've read the book, what are your thoughts? Include them in the comments below!

Monday, August 26, 2013

Two new eNewsletters released this month: Power Generation and Synthetics & Hydraulics!

In case you've missed them, we have now launched 5 eNewsletters that focus on a specific topic relevant to lubrication engineers and tribologists. Among those, we have Metalworking & Metalworking Fluids, Grease, Environmentally Friendly Fluids (EFF), and two brand-new ones out this month: Power Generation and Synthetics & Hydraulics.

You can read more about the program launch here - STLE's Executive Director provides his perspective in September's Headquarters Report column.

If you didn't receive any of the newsletters and you're interested in subscribing, you can do so by logging in to your account at www.stle.org, and updating your demographic information. There is a list of interest areas, and you can select one or many, depending on your interests. If you do not have an account, you will need to create one and then update your demographic information.

We're still looking for contributors to be able to launch our other 4: Lubrication Fundamentals, Engine & Drivetrain, Condition Monitoring, and Bearings, Gears & Seals. If you're interested in contributing, we're looking for short articles (about 1 page, or 400-800 words), on a specific topic that provides best practices, case studies, or other practical information that readers can immediately use. Submitted articles should be educational in nature, not commercial (i.e. not promoting your company or product) and they should not be technical papers. Technical papers have many other outlets including our two scholarly journals: Tribology Transactions and Tribology Letters). If you are interested, you can send an email to Kara Sniegowski at ksniegowski@stle.org or by calling our office at (847) 825-5536.

I look forward to your contributions! And feel free to submit topic ideas below, in the comments.

Thursday, August 22, 2013

Turbine Oil Selection with Greg Livingstone, Fluitec International

Greg Livingstone
Join us for this week's interview, where we talk with Greg Livingstone, Chief Marketing Officer of Fluitec International about selecting a proper turbine oil for your application.

Greg covers types of oils used in turbines and their properties, when it's time to select a new oil, potential changes you should implement in your condition monitoring program with new oils, and selection criteria - including Greg's advice to look beyond the spec sheet, and some tests you should run when selecting an oil (which includes a new test Greg helped develop which provides more reliable data on how the oil will perform in the field). 

To listen to the interview, click here for the audio, or click here to read the transcript. 

You might also be interested in our previous interview with Greg on Oil Analysis & Predictive Maintenance (click here for the recording), or his upcoming interview that will be released in the November issue of the Power Generation eNewsletter on Turbine Oil Degradation. 

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

September Webinars: MWF CM, Emulsifers, & RCL

This month we'll be featuring three events, all part of a series. We'll continue our reliability-centered lubrication series (three part series) and finish out the MWF microbiology series (three part series), as well as our emulsifier series (two part series). See below for more details on each and to preview upcoming topics.

Contamination Control of MWFs
Date/Time: Wednesday, September 18, 2013; 12-1 pm CDT (with additional time for Q&A from 1-1:30)
Instructor: Frederick Passman, Biodeterioration Control Associates, Inc. (BCA)
Overview: This webinar will cover the four primary building blocks of cost-effective microbial contamination control: system design & engineering, industrial hygiene, condition monitoring (CM), and treatment. Participants in this webinar will gain a broad appreciation of the factors that contribute to effective microbial contamination control in MWF and MWF systems.
Cost: $39 for members; $59 for non-members
[Click here] for more information
[Click here] to register now (please log in at www.stle.org, then click the registration link)
For more information on the other two events in the series, click their links: Basic MWF Microbiology, and Monitoring MWF Microbial Contamination

Emulsifiers 201
Date/Time: Thursday, September 19, 2013; 12-1 pm CDT (with additional time for Q&A from 1-1:30)
Instructors: Jennifer Ineman & Tom Oleksiak, The Lubrizol Corporation
Overview: The second part of this series will include analytical techniques that can be used to determine differences in performance characteristics of emulsifier chemistry. If you're interested, click here for more information on Emulsifiers 101.
Cost: $39 for members; $59 for non-members
[Click here] for more information
[Click here] to register (please log in at www.stle.org, then click the registration link)

Reliability-Centered Lubrication, Part II
Date/Time: Wednesday, September 25, 2013; 12-1 pm CDT (with additional time for Q&A from 1-1:30)
Instructor: Mike Johnson, Advanced Machine Reliability Resources Inc.(AMRRI)
Overview: Following the development of a strong business case to re-order lubrication practices, the next step involves determining which machines will receive a detailed assessment and development of RCL practices. Creating a lubrication program starts with a clear understanding of the importance of each machine to daily productivity. A general criticality assessment will provide the site with a clear idea of which machines warrant RCL attention.  This seminar will offer a look at a simple but effective plan to rank your machines from most to least important.  We’ll also review the information collection process and the creation of detailed plans that are the best fit for the operating conditions.
Cost: $39 for members; $59 for non-members
[Click here] for more information
[Click here] to register now (please log in at www.stle.org, then click the registration link)
For more information on the other two events in the series, click their links: RCL, Part I and RCL, Part III

Upcoming topics:
[Click here] to see all topics booked for 2013 (new events posted as information becomes available)
[Click here] to view online events in our calendar

Friday, July 26, 2013

Thoughtful Thursday: What's your favorite quote?

Every Thursday this summer, we'll have a tweet that asks you to respond with your thoughts and comments. This week the question revolved around your favorite quote and who said it (and if you want to tell us why, that's great too!). We got a few responses, but feel free to keep adding in the comments below!

  • @richbcs: "All of us are in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -Oscar Wilde
  • @karlphipps: "Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." -Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • @karalemar: "Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire." -W.B. Yeats
You can read more favorite quotes from members here. And don't forget to follow us on Twitter (@STLE_Tribology) or like us on Facebook.

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

August Webinars: Reliability-Centered Lubrication, Microbiology, and Emulsifiers

This month we'll be featuring three events, all part of a series. We'll kick off our reliability-centered lubrication series (three part series), continue our MWF microbiology series (also three events), and see the last of two events in the emulsifier series. See below for more details on each and to preview upcoming topics.

Reliability-Centered Lubrication (Part I of III)
Date/Time: Wednesday, August 14, 2013; 12-1 pm CDT (with additional time for Q&A from 1-1:30)
Instructor: Mike Johnson, CLS
Overview: In this first event (of a three-event series on RCL) we will take a look at the strategy and overview the tactics involved in achieving RCL practices.  We will also look at a critical aspect of this concept, which is making a business justification for the investment of time and energy to fundamentally change the way that lubrication activities are conducted.
Cost: $39 for members; $59 for non-members
[Click here] for more information
[Click here] to register now (please log in at www.stle.org, then click here)

Monitoring MWF Microbial Contamination
Date/Time: Wednesday, August 21, 2013; 12-1 pm CDT (with additional time for Q&A from 1-1:30)
Instructor: Dr. Frederick Passman, BCA, Inc.
Overview: Condition monitoring (CM) for microbial contamination shares common features with other routinely performed MWF CM.  However, there are several concepts that are unique to microbiological sample collection, handling, testing and data interpretation.  Optimal MWF management depends on understanding these unique concepts.  During this webinar, Dr. Passman will provide a very brief overview of the microbiology basics as a refresher for those who have participated in the earlier webinar and a means of bringing newcomers up to speed. He’ll then discuss some of the most critical elements of microbiological sample collection.  The underlying concept behind this information is that the microbiology of the bulk MWF is very different from that of surface and aerosol samples.  Low numbers of microbes in bulk fluid samples can give a false sense of effective contamination control.  Moreover, samples intended for microbiological testing are quite perishable and need to be handled accordingly.  Dr. Passman will describe best practices for handling microbiological samples from time of sampling to the initiation of testing. The greatest portion of the webinar will focus on a discussion of the methods that are most useful for microbiological CM.  There is no single microbiological test that provides all of the relevant information about MWF microbial contamination.  Dr. Passman will describe the methods, the type and value of information each method can and can’t provide and best use of data for system management.
Cost: $39 for members; $59 for non-members
[Click here] for more information
[Click here] to register (please log in at www.stle.org, then click here)

Upcoming topics:
[Click here] to see all topics booked for 2013 (new events posted as information becomes available)
[Click here] to view online events in our calendar

Tuesday, July 9, 2013

5 Minutes with...Hamed Ghaednia

5 Minutes with...

Hamed Ghaednia, PhD Student, Mechanical Engineering at Auburn University

Hamed with his poster at the 2013 STLE Annual Meeting
What got you interested in tribology, and where has that interest led you? Looking back, I can recognize a couple of events over the course of my studies that prepared me and got me interested in the field of tribology.  While I was working on my undergrad I was offered to enter a double major program as part of an honors program.  I was given the choice to select a second major and I chose to study chemical engineering because of my fascination with chemical processes.  I did not know it at the time, but the mechanical/chemical engineering combination gave me a boost through my career in the field of tribology. My first exposure to tribology research was when I started working on my master’s degree.  I was looking for research topics that included both of my majors so I started working on the semi-active control of a rotor mounted on magneto-rheological journal bearings.  My research involved: numerical simulations of a rotors’ vibrations, MR fluid journal bearing modeling and design of a fuzzy control system.  My Master’s thesis was partly related to tribology. However, I had the opportunity to engage in a variety of research topics related to tribology when I began my PhD research at Auburn University.  That was when I began to really appreciate the complexity and interdisciplinary approach to tribology in solving unique and cutting edge problems, which got me interested in tribology. I have been active in the field of tribology ever since as a Research Assistant in the Multiscale Tribology Laboratory at the Auburn University and I have been involved in a range of topics such as nanotribology, lubrication and contact mechanics.

Can you give us some detail on your research? Currently, I am focused on the effect of nanoparticle additives on lubricants as my PhD project. Nano-sizes particles are small enough to infiltrate the small gaps between surfaces in contact and alter the tribological characteristics. However the particles’ exact enhancing mechanisms remain unknown (with a few exceptions). This project has different angles and challenges to be explored, such as stability of nanoparticle suspensions. Usually the base oils are non-polar so there is no strong intermolecular force available to suspend the particles. Nanoparticles change the bulk properties of the lubricants, such as viscosity and thermal conductivity, which need to be quantified. The main goal of the project is to understand the effect of particles on friction and wear and to study the interaction of particles with surfaces under high pressure.  This project involves a variety of different experimental techniques ranging from purely chemical tests to friction and surface analysis tests. In addition, I am working on developing a contact model for nanoparticles between rough surfaces. Therefore it is a very good opportunity for me to get involved in various tribological topics and try to increase my knowledge of tribology. I am two and half years into this project and have tackled multiple fronts of the project. Results so far are very interesting and I have couple of papers in publication and in preparation on the subject.

During my Master’s program I was working on magnetorheological (MR) journal bearings. MR bearings consist of a conventional bearings filled with the MR fluid.  MR fluid is a suspension of micron size ferromagnetic particles in a base oil. MR fluids’ viscosity and rheology changes under an applied external magnetic field that could be utilized to control the response of the bearing in a feedback control system.  The first goal of the study was to develop a heat transfer model for the bearings and explore the effect of temperature rise on the performance of the rotor-bearing system. The second goal was to design and implement a semi-active fuzzy control system to minimize the vibrations of the system.

What recommendations would you give to other students and researchers in the field? Grad school is usually stressful, lengthy and typically revolves around your research. Therefore take plenty of time to explore your possibilities and choose the research topic that you like and enjoy learning about. This can significantly improve your grad school experience.

As known, tribology mainly explores the contacts between different materials. These can be in different phases and are governed by different physical or chemical principles. Tribology links different physical and chemical concepts together in search of an answer.  Tribology does not stop at the edge of the materials; it bridges the gaps. Hence, if you are want to be involved in this field, my advice is to be willing to bridge the gaps and learn every day.

Any final thoughts you’d like to give readers? Don’t forget that many breakthroughs in the history of mankind came from early tribologists.  Examples of these are cavemen making fire out of friction and the invention of the first rolling element bearing, the wheel. Thus, it is probable that a tribologist will invent the next revolutionary device or discover the key to the next chapter of engineering!

For more info, click here to read The 10 Greatest Events in Tribology History (article and poster)

Hamed’s Favorites 
Tribology book/reference: Even though I use several tribology-related books on a regular basis, I can name three books as my favorites:


Favorite professor(s)/mentor(s): Dr. Jackson and Dr. Ohadi, my PhD and Master’s advisors, are my favorite professors and mentors.
Favorite online resource related to your research: http://www.tribology-abc.com/
Favorite quote:  “Believe those who are seeking the truth. Doubt those who find it.” – Andre Gide, French critic, essayist, & novelist (1869 - 1951)

Biography
Hamed Ghaednia received his BS degrees in Mechanical Engineering and in Chemical Engineering from the Tehran Polytechnic (also known as Amirkabir University of Technology), Iran, in 2007 and 2010, respectively. During his undergraduate he was a member of the Parsian Robotic Group and participated in several international robotic competitions and won awards. He received his MS degree in Mechanical Engineering from Tehran Polytechnic in 2010 while working as a Graduate Assistant for the Vibration and Noise Control Laboratory. He is currently pursuing his PhD in Mechanical Engineering, in the field of Tribology, at Auburn University. He is currently a Research Assistant at the Multiscale Tribology Laboratory. He has published papers in the fields of: nano particle lubricants, magneto-rheological fluid (MR fluid) bearings and contact mechanics. His current research involvements are nanoparticle lubricants, nanotribology and contact mechanics.

Mr. Ghaednia is a member of the Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers (STLE) and American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME).

Monday, July 1, 2013

July Webinars: Air, Gas Compressors & MWF Microbiology

This month we'll be featuring three events - two covering compressors, and one on metalworking fluids. See below for more details on each and to preview upcoming topics.

Air Compressors & Their Lubrication
Date/Time: Wednesday, July 10, 2013; 12-1 pm CDT (with additional time for Q&A from 1-1:30)
Instructor: Glenn Short, BVA
Overview: This webinar will provide you with basic compressor fundamentals, the different types of lubricants that can be used, some of the important properties compressor lubricants should possess and their proper selection. The focus will be primarily on positive displacement compressors, formulating with synthetic lubricants, and strategies for efficiency improvement and extending lubricant service life.
Cost: $39 for members; $59 for non-members
[Click here] for more information
[Click here] to register now (please log in at www.stle.org, then click here)

Gas & Process Compressor Lubricants
Date/Time: Thursday, July 11, 2013; 12-1 pm CDT (with additional time for Q&A from 1-1:30)
Instructor: Glenn Short, BVA
Overview: In this webinar, you will learn about the different types of lubricants that are used in gas and process compressors, some of the important properties compressor lubricants should possess and their proper selection. The focus will be primarily on positive displacement compressors and other compressors where the lubricant may come into contact with the gas being compressed, formulating with special types of mineral oils and synthetic lubricants to improve compatibility with the gas being compressed, and strategies for efficiency improvement and compressor reliability.
Cost: $39 for members; $59 for non-members
[Click here] for more information
[Click here] to register (please log in at www.stle.org, then click here)

MWF Microbiology Basics
Date/Time: Wednesday, July 17, 2013; 12-1 pm CDT (with additional time for Q&A from 1-1:30)
Instructor: Dr. Frederick Passman, BCA, Inc.
Overview: This webinar is a primer on MWF microbiology, including what microbes are, the types of damage they can cause if left to grow uncontrolled in MWF and the health risks associated with bioaerosol exposure. The first part of the webinar will discuss the types of microbes that are commonly found in MWF, why they thrive in the MWF environment and where they are most likely to be found in MWF systems. The next part of the program will describe fluid, system and finished part damage related microbial life in MWF systems. The final segment will explain how bioaerosols are generated and the common types of diseases caused by exposure to these aerosols. 
Cost: $39 for members; $59 for non-members
[Click here] for more information
[Click here] to register now (please log in at www.stle.org, then click here)

Upcoming topics:
[Click here] to see all topics booked for 2013 (new events posted as information becomes available)
[Click here] to view online events in our calendar

Wednesday, May 15, 2013

June Webinars include Emulsifiers 101, Waste Treatment of MWFs, & The Steel Industry

This month we'll be featuring two events on metalworking fluid topics: Emulsifiers 101 and Waste Treatment of Metalworking Fluids, as well as an event covering the steel industry. See below for more details on each and to preview upcoming topics.

Emulsifiers 101
Date/Time: Wednesday, June 5, 2013; 12-1 pm CDT (with additional time for Q&A from 1-1:30)
Instructor: Joe Schultz and Jennifer Ineman, The Lubrizol Corporation
Overview: The first part of this series will include the basics of what an emulsion is, what chemistries and which fluid types are typically used in metalworking applications, what the hydrophilic-lipophilic balance is and why it is important to emulsifier selection.
Cost: $39 for members; $59 for non-members
Note: This is the first event in a two-part series. [Click here] for information on Emulsifiers 201.
[Click here] for more information
[Click here] to register now (must log in to obtain correct pricing)

Waste Treatment of Metalworking Fluids
Date/Time: Wednesday, June 12, 2013; 12-1 pm CDT (with additional time for Q&A from 1-1:30)
Instructor: John M. Burke, Houghton International
Overview: This webinar will briefly discuss waste water disposal requirements for users of metalworking fluids in the United States. We will then discuss several methods of waste water treatment such as: evaporation, chemical treatment, membrane separation, biological treatment, vapor compression distillation, and finally waste oil recovery.
Cost: $39 for members; $59 for non-members
[Click here] for more information
[Click here] to register (must log in to obtain correct pricing)

The Steel Industry
Date/Time: Wednesday, June 26, 2013; 12-1 pm CDT (with additional time for Q&A from 1-1:30)
Instructor: Rick Schrama
Overview: This webinar on the steel industry will provide an overview of what the industry entails, the three main producing groups (integrated plants, mini-mills and finishing operations), the types of lubricants employed in the various operations and their typical properties and challenges/problems, as well as lubricant guidelines and lubrication systems. The last major topic to be reviewed is the actual steel making and processing operations. This includes the primary end of the integrated plant with its raw material handling, sinter plants, coke ovens, blast furnaces and direct reduction plants. The steel making side of the process with its electric arc and basic oxygen furnace technologies and then the continuous casting and hot rolling facilities will be reviewed. That is followed by the cold finishing and coating processes with its pickling, cold rolling, tempering and either galvanized or electrolytic tinning processes. The last part of any facility is the utilities and transportation groups, which includes the turbines, compressed gas compressors, motors, overhead cranes, rolling stock and trucks. The types of machinery and the bearings and drive components used in the processes will be outlined and related to their lubrication requirements.  
Cost: $39 for members; $59 for non-members
[Click here] for more information
[Click here] to register now (must log in to obtain correct pricing)

Upcoming topics:
[Click here] to see all topics booked for 2013 (new events posted as information becomes available)
[Click here] to view online events in our calendar

Thursday, May 2, 2013

Things to Do in The "D" (Detroit)

Getting some perspectives from STLE staff and members, here are some suggested attractions and restaurants, if you're planning your trip to join us next week. And don't forget that Detroit has an easy way to get around the city - the PeopleMover. The weather should be in the mid-high 60s all week, so be sure to pack for that, and remember to wear layers while you're attending the conference - conference centers and big hotels have a tendency to run cold.

Don Smolenski: Don loves the water, and as such, recommends you check out the Detroit Riverfront, along Lake St. Clair. He also recommends the following restaurants: Sinbad's Restaurant, Fishbone's Rhythm Kitchen, Mike's on the Water, Rojo Mexican Bistro, Brownie's on the Lake and The Rattlesnake Club. The river walk is also quite nice for running or biking. There are a few shops, and this area has the largest concentration of boats in fresh water. It's a great place to take a break - get away, go for a walk and while you're there, take in the water, the boats, and the beautiful mansions along the lake shore. "Lake Clair is one of the reasons I love living in Detroit. It's not as intimidating as Lake Erie or Michigan, but you can still see water for miles."

Charlie Paxton: The Henry Ford Museum is a little far from the meeting location, but it's always good. And, if you make the trip, you can also visit the largest IMAX theater in the state of Michigan. Charlie, as part of the Detroit Section, helped set up a tour of the GM Plant that produced the Volt (the tour filled up within a short couple of days!). Thanks to the Detroit Section, those attending get free transportation.

Rachel Colbert: says that there are some great lakes and parks in Detroit (Ash Park is closest to the hotel), and she also recommends Greektown and the Ford Museum.

Tracy VanEe: This Detroit-native STLE staff member recommends The Fox Theater (historic and very ornate), which is next to Hockeytown - lots of Red Wings nostalgia to be found here.

Attractions: Motown Museum, Heidelberg Project, The Detroit Institute of Art, Detroit Zoo, Comerica Park for a Tigers game, and Cobo Hall or the Joe Louis Arena (if you check the concert schedule, you might catch one of Detroit's locals - Bob Seger, Kid Rock or Eminem).

Restaurant favorites: Elwood Bar & Grill and the Detroit Beer Co.are around Comerica Park. For upscale dining, try the Rattlesnake Club. For less-than-upscale, try The Coney Island Challenge - Lafayette and American Coney Islands -they're located next to each other and make a show over luring customers into one diner over the other. Old Shillelagh's is a fun Irish pub - they have live music and it's always fun and festive. In addition to Greektown, there is Mexican Town, with a string of Mexican restaurants. My favorite is Xochimilco's (pronounced Soshimoko's), which has great fare.

If you're bringing family, or are just interested in a charming town, try Birmingham (about 5 miles away from Detroit) - it has lots of nice shops and dining.

If you want to go outside of Detroit, visit Dearborn for the Henry Ford Museum, Automotive Hall of Fame, and the Ford Dearborn Truck Plant to see where they make the F150. In addition, try Greenfield Village (historical town, mini-Williamsburg).

Or, try the two Big 10 University towns - East Lansing and Ann Arbor. They're within an hour's drive of Detroit and are great places to visit.
Don't forget to take a look at the Visit Detroit website (look at the Downtown Detroit area), and local attractions on the Marriott's website.

What will you be visiting or doing while in Detroit? Respond in the comments below, send me an email to be included in this post (to ksniegowski@stle.org), or your tweet activities (using hashtag #STLE2013)!

And Visit Detroit has some great videos, including this one, on Downtown Detroit.

Friday, April 19, 2013

Registration Now Open for May Webinars: Solvents & Cleaners and Biobased Lubes & Greases

This month we'll be featuring more on environmentally friendly, or biobased lubricants and greases, as well as solvents and cleaners. See below for more details on each and to preview upcoming topics.

Solvents & Cleaners in Industrial Applications
Date/Time: Wednesday, May 22, 2013; 12-1 pm CST (with additional time for Q&A from 1-1:30)
Instructor: Russ Chambers, Quadra Chemicals
Overview: In this webinar, we will cover types on solvents and cleaners, as well as their composition and properties, leading to the selection of a solvent or cleaner. We’ll also cover industry-specific applications – the when, why and how you’d use a solvent or cleaner. We’ll also cover health and safety issues, as well as new regulations and trends.
Cost: $39 for members; $59 for non-members
[Click here] for more information
[Click here] to register now (must log in to obtain correct pricing)

Biobased Lubes & Greases: Respected Market Contenders
Date/Time: Thursday, May 30, 2013; 12-1 pm CST (with additional time for Q&A from 1-1:30)
Instructor: Dr. Lou Honary, UNI-NABL
Overview: This webinar provides an overview of the technical and commercial opportunities in biobased lubricants and grease areas. Topics will include a brief historical review of the biobased lubricants and grease technologies, new developments in base vegetable or crop oils, base oil modifications including genetic enhancement of seed oils and chemical modifications of base oils, and advances in performance enhancing additives.  There will also be a brief presentation on new processing technologies for manufacturing biobased products.
Cost: $39 for members; $59 for non-members
[Click here] for more information
[Click here] to register (must log in to obtain correct pricing)

Upcoming topics:
[Click here] to see all topics booked for 2013 (new events posted as information becomes available)
[Click here] to view online events in our calendar

Friday, March 29, 2013

2013 Annual Meeting - Early Bird Pricing Expires Monday!

Don't forget to save a bit of money by registering early - by April 1.
Take a look at the Preliminary Program Guide and start making your plans so you can be part of this can't-miss conference!

[Click here] to view the conference brochure (left), or [click here] for the PDF download
[Click here] to register online
[Click here] to download a PDF registration form (fax or scan/email back in)
[Click here] for the Corporate Member registration form - you get two free registrations and two free education courses with the Basic tier, and three registrations and three courses with the Premium!

Still not sure if you should attend this year?
1. We have recorded some of the sessions that were chosen by attendees at last year's Annual Meeting - they chose these presentations as Highlights they'd like to review and share after the conference. [Click here] to listen to some of the sessions chosen as Highlights from last year's meeting

2. Read The Business Case For Attending STLE's Annual Meeting - either to present to your supervisor, or to assuage any of your own doubts. And read our President's Message on the meeting, Tradition and Innovation.

3. Check out some Detroit blogs (including Visit Detroit, Detroit Moxie, Detroit UnSpun, Dig Downtown, and Eat It Detroit), to get a feel for the destination. Also be sure to read our tips for first time attendees, and get some perspective from past attendees.

4. Hear it direct from other members and non-members who've attended - see our testimonials below! Or read more here.
  • “I can always count on the Annual STLE Meeting and Exhibitions to have all our customers under one roof and great networking. It is a great way to keep in touch with the pulse of the industry.” – David Oesterle, The Lubrizol Corporation
  • Evan Zabawski
  • “The STLE Annual Meeting is the best venue for sales, marketing, and technical people to meet and discuss products that are instrumental in moving our industry forward.” –Samuel Wolfe, Wolfe Chemicals
  • “The STLE Annual Meeting offers both the best information on tribological related research and the best technical approaches to improve equipment reliability. Technical session and exhibition provides a proper balance of basic understanding and practical applications. Technical courses offer additional edge of required knowledge.” – George Staniewski, Ontario Power Generation
  • “A great event to both meet colleagues involved in all facets of lubrication, and partake of the excellent technical content.” – Evan Zabawski
  • Don Smolenski
  • “This was my first time attending. I took 3 courses and all were excellent and presenters were extremely knowledgeable. Overall, a great group of people. They were friendly and willing to share expertise and discuss technology.” – Gary Bilski, Honeywell Consumer Products Group
  • “Outstanding opportunity to meet and discuss with experts within the biggest and most active association of tribologists worldwide.” – Steffen Bots, Oelcheck
  • “The STLE Annual Meeting provides excellent technical content, training, exhibits and networking, all in one place.” – David Turner, Shell Global Solutions
  • “Presentation technical quality was very good. Networking was excellent. The meeting is great for collaboration.” – Don Smolenski, General Motors (now Evonik)

Thursday, March 28, 2013

Resources & Navigating the Annual Meeting for Students & Early Careerists

Read on below for information on upcoming events, deadlines and news for both students and early careerists. Each item will be marked with an S (for student), EC (for early careerist), or both.

Tweet the Meeting (S, EC)
If you’d like to be more involved during the conference and share information with fellow attendees, we’re encouraging attendees to use Twitter to tweet noteworthy sessions, questions, resources, and information on talks you’re presenting.

We have started to compile a list of attendees and if you’d like to be included, just tweet using the #STLE2013 hashtag, or email us your Twitter handle. And stop by the Membership Booth to see our live Twitter wall, where we’ll display #STLE2013 tweets. Don’t forget to follow @STLE_Tribology for news, information and resources direct from STLE!
 
2013 Annual Meeting Networking Event (S, EC)

Click here for more photos from 2012

This year’s Early Careerist Networking Event will be held at Drive – the ping pong social club, on Sunday, May 5, from 7-10 pm. Drive is a quick walk or PeopleMover ride from the Renaissance Center. Admission is FREE for all you students and early careerists and includes a chance to show off your ping pong skills, a drink ticket and sweets, and a great opportunity to network with some of STLE’s well-known members! RSVP to ensure space by April 19. Send your RSVP to Kara Sniegowski at ksniegowski@stle.org, or call us at (847) 825-5536.
[Click here] to visit Drive’s website
[Click here] to get information on the PeopleMover
Like us on Facebook or join our LinkedIn group to receive updates on this event

2 Days Left to Apply for Annual Meeting Housing Award (S)
The Young Tribologists Committee is sponsoring the annual Housing Award for our conference coming up in May. Applications are due March 30, so be sure to get yours in to see if you can get a free hotel stay while at the 2013 Annual Meeting!
[Click here] for details and to apply

Scholarships Available (S)

Our local sections – including Central Illinois and Philadelphia – are currently offering scholarships to students working in the field of lubrication and tribology. Deadlines are April 1 and May 1. Don’t miss your chance – apply today!
[Click here] for details and to apply

Upcoming Webinar Series (S, EC)

Starting this year, we’ll be offering a series of FREE webinars on topics relevant to students and early careerists to help you get ahead in your career. The first webinar has been scheduled, with more topics to come. See below for details and to register. Future topics will include: How to Present Your Work, Successful Grant Writing as well as job-search related topics. If you’d like to make a suggestion, contact Kara Sniegowski.
  • 4/8: Best Practices for Presenting Your Poster | REGISTER
  • 4/15: Getting Published | REGISTER
  • 4/16: Preview/Demo the New Annual Meeting App | REGISTER
To receive information on the webinar series, the networking event, scholarships and awards, you’ll have to mark your interest in your online profile. Simply log in at www.stle.org, click to edit your Demographic information and choose “Early Careerist” as an interest area. You’ll then start receiving information on articles, events and resources catered to you.

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

#STLE2013 Education Courses - Register before Early Bird to save!

The Early Bird deadline (April 1) to register for the 2013 STLE Annual Meeting & Exhibition is coming up fast. Be sure to get registered for the meeting, and while you're doing that, be sure to sign up for an education course. It never hurts to sign up for a refresher on a given topic, maintain your certification, get started in a new area that you've been assigned at work, or simply learn more. Courses will be offered on Sunday, May 5, and Wednesday, May 8, 2013. They include:

Sunday, May 5
Wednesday, May 8
[Click here] for more details, or click on the course title for more information on each.

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

April Webinar Registration Now Open - EFFs and Test Methods

This month we'll be featuring environmentally friendly fluids and test methods for lubricants. See below for more details on each and to preview upcoming topics.

Challenges in Using Environmentally Friendly Fluids
Date/Time: Thursday, April 11, 2013; 12-1 pm CST (with additional time for Q&A from 1-1:30)
Instructor: Dr. Neil Canter, Chemical Solutions
Overview: The purpose of this webinar is to provide information on the challenges in working with environmentally friendly lubricants. As part of this process, the confusion about what is an environmentally friendly lubricant and what is biodegradable is discussed. Two of the key detrimental properties for environmentally friendly lubricants are covered along with some of their main applications. Two government sponsored programs (the US Biopreferred Program and the European Union Eco-Label Program) are reviewed with details provided on what testing is needed to comply with both. Examples are given of guidelines for specific lubricant applications. The webinar will conclude with an assessment of the future of environmentally friendly lubricants.
Cost: $39 for members; $59 for non-members
[Click here] for more information
[Click here] to register now (must log in to obtain correct pricing)

Test Methods for Lubricants
Date/Time: Friday, April 19, 2013; 12-1 pm CST (with additional time for Q&A from 1-1:30)
Instructor: Ray Thibault, LTC
Overview: This webinar will discuss the various ASTM tests which evaluate lubricant performance. These tests are utilized as predictors of actual field performance of lubricants. It is important to understand these test methods and their correlation to field performance when making lubricant decisions. All the major tests will be discussed with major emphasis on testing procedures, results interpretation, and relevance to field performance. Turbine, hydraulic, and gear oil tests will be examined utilizing sample data sheets from some of the major suppliers. Also, OEM requirements for these various product groups will be presented.After this webinar you will feel more confident in understanding the various performance tests so you can make meaningful comparisons between lubricant suppliers’ products.
Cost: $39 for members; $59 for non-members
[Click here] for more information
[Click here] to register (must log in to obtain correct pricing)

Upcoming topics:
[Click here] to see all topics booked for 2013 (new events posted as information becomes available)
[Click here] to view online events in our Calendar

Friday, March 8, 2013

5 Minutes With...Juliane Benedet, MechEng PhD Student, Imperial College London

5 Minutes with… 
Juliane, STLE Annual Meeting 2010, Las Vegas
Juliane Benedet, PhD student, Mechanical Engineering at Imperial College London

What got you interested in tribology, and where has that interest led you? To support myself through my undergraduate degree in Chemical Engineering I worked for the National Service for Industrial Training in Brazil, which is a network of nonprofit professional schools and technology centres that have been established and maintained by the Brazilian Confederation of Industry. These institutions provide formal training for specialized workers in the areas of chemistry, mechanics, construction, etc. Having always been interested in research, I found myself surrounded by like minded people who had a strong academic background. They encouraged me to specialise and pursue postgraduate qualifications.

Upon moving to the UK in 2006, I had the opportunity to work on the research and development of additives for both fuels and lubricants and when the opportunity to do a PhD in Tribology presented itself in the end of 2007, I did not think twice. When I first started I was looking forward to learning more about lubrication and lubricants, but given the multidisciplinary nature of this amazing science I have learnt so much more. It has been a great privilege to work alongside chemists, physicists, material scientists, chemical engineers and mechanical engineers in the Tribology group at Imperial College London, which has an outstanding reputation for experimental tribological research.

Can you give us some detail on your current research? Because energy demands are expected to double by 2050, lubricants are required to reduce friction and thus energy consumption, while maintaining reliability; throughout my PhD I have investigated the film-forming, friction and wear-reducing properties of a very wide range of potential, low and zero sulphated ash, phosphorus and sulphur (SAPS) antiwear additives of different chemical types to replace ZDDP in engine oils and mitigate its deleterious effects, i.e. (i) degradation of exhaust aftertreatment systems, (ii) increase in engine friction, which compromise fuel economy and (iii) corrosive-abrasive wear with soot in diesel engines.

I employed a multi-technique approach, i.e. MTM-SLIM, MTM-Reciprocating, AFM, FIB-SIMS, FIB-TEM, ToF-SIMS and XANES, in order to determine which classes of lubricant additive types are able to form protective boundary films that reduce wear and friction in rubbing contacts. This study benefits designers of the next generation of engine lubricants and also helps us understand at a more fundamental level the various ways that lubricants can control wear in boundary lubrication conditions.

What recommendations would you give to other students and researchers in the field? Although very rewarding, research can also be quite lonesome sometimes, so try to have perseverance, keep a close eye on the details and ask for help or a second opinion.

Tribologists and tribologists-to-be: don’t mind if most people have no idea what Tribology is. There are endless examples of “tribology-at-work” from cars and machines to joint replacements, food and hair products. No matter how much you try to explain, some people will still look puzzled and either say you are brainy or make a few lubrication-related jokes, don’t worry you can always count on your fellow tribologists.

What are some of your favorites?
Tribology/Mechanical Engineering book: Engineering Tribology by Gwidon Stachowiak and Andrew Batchelor
Professor: Professor Hugh Spikes, for his invaluable support, insights and encouragement throughout my PhD.
Website: Tribology ABC http://www.tribology-abc.com/
Interests: Because I am of Italian-Brazilian descent I have inherited a passion for food and cooking so I spend my free time trying new recipes and entertaining my good friends and family.

Biography
Juliane has received her Bachelor degree in Chemical Engineering in 2005, from the University of Southern Santa Catarina in Brazil, where she worked for the National Service for Industrial Training (SENAI, 1998-2005) in the investigation, optimization and knowledge transfer of rheological aspects of ceramic suspensions.

She began working in the R&D of additives in 2006 at Infineum UK, where she investigated lubricity and detergency improvers for diesel fuels, afterwards joining Castrol Ltd in 2007 to investigate the thermal stability of lubricating oils. She briefly re-joined Infineum in 2011 as a Power Transmission Fluid Technologist, responsible for proposing technical solutions to fluid related hardware issues.

Currently, she is a PhD student in the Tribology Group of the Mechanical Engineering Department at Imperial College London, where she has investigated the film-forming, friction and wear-reducing properties of a very wide range of alternative low and zero sulphated ash, phosphorus and sulphur (SAPS) antiwear additives of different chemical types to improve the next generation of engine oils and extend the life of vehicle exhaust aftertreatment systems.

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

March Webinar Registration Open - Synthetics & Heavy Duty Engine Oils

This month we'll be featuring basic synthetics and heavy duty engine oils - evolution and status. See below for more details on each and to preview upcoming topics.
Heavy Duty Engine Oils, Evolution & Status
Date/Time: Wednesday, March 27, 2013; 12-1 pm CST (with additional time for Q&A from 1-1:30)
Instructor: Dr. Hind Abi-Akar, Technical Expert, Fluids Engineering Group, Caterpillar Inc.
Overview: This webinar will describe the main factors responsible for oil quality and performance, the evolution of the API oil program, the API licensing process, HD oil API category currently under development and challenges for off-road engine oils.  Additionally, brief introduction into the alternative fuels and impacts on engine oils will be presented. 
Cost: $39 for members; $59 for non-members
[Click here] for more information
[Click here] to register (must log in to obtain correct pricing)

Basic Synthetics
Date/Time: Thursday, March 28, 2013; 12-1 pm CST (with additional time for Q&A from 1-1:30)
Instructor: Dr. Robert M. Gresham, Director of Professional Development, STLE
Overview: This basic webinar is for those new to the industry or new to synthetic lubricants.  The webinar will cover the benefits obtained when using synthetic fluids, cost/benefit relationships, the major types of synthetic fluids and nine major industrial and automotive application areas where synthetic lubricants are beneficial.
Cost: $39 for members; $59 for non-members
[Click here] for more information
[Click here] to register now (must log in to obtain correct pricing)

Upcoming topics:
[Click here] to see all topics booked for 2013 (new events posted as information becomes available)
[Click here] to view online events in our Calendar

Thursday, January 31, 2013

Open Registration For Bearing, Filter & Synthetic Fundamentals Webinars

In February (and into March), we'll be focusing on fundamentals - including bearings, filters and synthetics. Be sure to keep an eye on our upcoming events for other events of interest.

Bearing Fundamentals
Date/Time: Wednesday, February 6, 2013; 12-1 pm CST (with additional time for Q&A from 1-1:30)
Instructor: Dr. Robert M. Gresham, Director of Professional Development, STLE
Overview: This basic webinar is designed for those new to the industry or at least new to the subject of bearings. The webinar will cover the 20 types of plain, rolling element and miscellaneous types of bearings showing what they look like and describing their primary design function.Then, we'll move on to general bearing lubrication including a very brief review of lubrication methods for bearing lubrication.
Cost: $39 for members; $59 for non-members
[Click here] for more information
[Click here] to register now (must log in to obtain correct pricing)

Fundamentals of Filters & Filtration
Date/Time: Wednesday, February 13, 2013; 12-1 pm CST (with additional time for Q&A from 1-1:30)
Instructor: Dr. John K. Duchowski, Director of Technology Development, HYDAC
Overview: The webinar will cover the fundamentals governing the process of filtration of hydraulic and lubricating fluids in industrial applications. Differences among various filtration media will be compared and contrasted. Various factors required to be taken into consideration during filter cartridge construction will be delineated and their impact on performance characteristics of filter elements will be described.
Cost: $39 for members; $59 for non-members
[Click here] for more information
[Click here] to register (must log in to obtain correct pricing)

Next month's topics:
[Click here] to see all topics booked for 2013 (new events posted as information becomes available)
[Click here] to view online events in our Calendar